About us

This project sparked off as a collaboration between Emma Renström (ex Bäck), Marie Gustafsson Sendén and Anna Lindqvist. The idea for the project was developed during one of our many coffee breaks at the department of psychology at Stockholm University, where we at the time where PhD students. One of us commented that a student had used the word hen had just started taking its first steps into the public. We sat with our coffee cups and speculated about what the effects this could be. Would hen become an integrated and natural part of the Swedish language? What would the consequences be? Eventually, we realized that the questions were so big and important that they needed to be empirically tested. We started to encourage students to write essays about hen, and started to form ideas for a joint research project.

In the spring of 2014 we all had our doctoral degrees, and we applied for research funds. That autumn, we received research funds from the Swedish Research Council and were able to seriously start engaging in investigating the psychological and cognitive aspects of hen’s entry into the Swedish language.

In the autumn of 2015, Hellen Vergoossen joined the project as a research assistant, and is now writing her dissertation within the project. In the autumn of 2017, the project grew further by incorporating Amanda Klysing as a research assistant. Amanda is now writing her dissertation within the project. In the Fall of 2018, When Amanda was accepted as a PhD student, Erik van Berlekom was recruited to fill the position as research assistent. A couple of months later, Lotta Stille also started as a research assistant in the project.

In the autumn of 2016 we were granted research funds from the Swedish Foundation for Humanities and Social Sciences and in the autumn of 2017 we were granted research funds from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare.

Marie Gustafsson Sendén received her doctoral degree in psychology in 2014 and is now an associate professor at the department of psychology at Södertörn University and Stockholm University. Personal webpage

 

 

Emma Renström (ex Bäck) received her doctoral degree in psychology in 2011 and is now an associate professor in psychology at the University of Gothenburg. Personal webpage

 

 

Anna Lindqvist received her doctoral degree in psychology in 2013 and is now an active researcher at the department of psychology at Lund University and Stockholm University. Personal webpage

 

 

Hellen Vergoossen wrote her master’s thesis about hen in the Spring of 2015 and worked as a research assistant in our project after that. Starting in the Autumn of 2016, Hellen is now a PhD student in psychology at Stockholm University, where she is writing her dissertation focused on henPersonal webpage

 

Amanda Klysing wrote her master’s thesis in psychology with a focus on gender in the Spring of 2017 and thereafter joined the project as a research assistant. Starting in the Autumn of 2018, Amanda is now a PhD student in psychology at Lund University, with a dissertation about gender-fair language

 

Erik van Berlekom started as an assistent in the project in September 2018. Their primary focus is to work with face perception in relation to a non-binary notion of gender, where they for example create faces to be used as stimuli materials. Personal webpage

 

 

Lotta Stille came on board in December 2018. She works as an assistent in the project, where she among other things analyzes our longitudinal data on how attitudes towards hen have changed over time.

 

 

Sabine Sczesny is professor in psychology at University of Bern, and our senior advisor. Personal webpage